Wednesday, November 18, 2020

Happenings at Russellville, Civil War Era

News and Gossip of Russellville 1838-1867

September 29, 1838 Western Sun Married on Tuesday evening, the 25th of September,1838, by the Rev. Mr. Bayles, Mr. Augustus V. Russell, of Russellville, Ill to Miss Jane Bonner, of Vincennes, Ind.

August 27, 1859 Weekly Sun W. B. Emmons, an intelligent and reliable farmer, living near Russellville, gives us a rather gloomy account of the prospect in his vicinity for the growing crops.  The dry, hot weather has injured a great deal of the corn past redemption; a good many fields will make nothing but nubbins.  The potatoes are also unpromising.  Acorn mast is very scare and poor in his neighborhood. 

December 22, 1860 Weekly Sun Wheat is worth 90 cents and corn 20 cents a bushel at Russellville.

October 11, 1862 Weekly Sun On Monday, John Hallet and Hugh and Persley Benton were arrested at Russellville on a charge of stealing several horses from Crawford County. The men were taken to the Lawrence County jail. 

July 11, 1863 Weekly Sun The citizens of Lawrence and Crawford counties united in celebrating the Fourth in a grand style, in a beautiful grove near Russellville.  We have heard the crowd estimated at from 3 to 4000 and we never witnessed a better state of feeling that was at this good old fashioned barbecue. The exercises were opened with prayer, followed by the reading of the Declaration of Independence. The crowd then adjourned to dinner and in the spite of the immense throng, there was an abundance of everything with enough to spare.  The whole affair passed off delightfully, and all who participated will not doubt always refer to it as one of the happiest and most pleasant events of their whole lives. 

September 1, 1866 Weekly Sun Let all those from Vincennes who desire to attend the Democratic and Conservative rally and basket dinner planned near Russellville, on the 8th of September, remember that the steamer Mate, with Capt. Dick Eastham will carry parties to and return on that occasion. 

September 15, 1866 Weekly Sun Saturday morning broke bright and beautiful upon Russellville for their grand Democratic and Conservative rally.  At an early hour, the various delegations began to arrive, with music and banters and Hoke’s Grove was soon crowded. There were at least 5,000 to 6,000 people on the ground including a great number of ladies.  There were hickory wagons, full of pretty girls, (the one from Russell Township being particularly conspicuous) and Hickory poles bearing aloft the star spangled banner.  The excellent brass band from Lawrenceville elicited much praise for their fine performances and did much to enliven the scene.

November 23, 1867 Weekly Sun A man named Jas. Clark, driving a wagon of movables from Vincennes toward Russellville on Thursday last, met another wagon on the road.  Neither of the drivers would turn off, and the wheels of their vehicles locked.  The horses became unmanageable, rearing and plunging furiously.  Clark was thrown out of his wagon; two of the wheels passed over him, injuring him very seriously.